BEIRUT DESIGN WEEK 2014, DESIGN RESEARCH, EVENT, SOCIAL INNOVATION

Nouvelle vague: the new french domestic landscape

“Les nouvelles forces du design français: une nouvelle fièvre entrepreneuriale”

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Cedric Morisset and Pauline Deltour came together yesterday at the Institut Français to talk to us about how the design scene across France has changed in the recent past. Even in the past ten to fifteen years, Morisset says, a growing number of young French editors has emerged, which means that a lot of French designers can now produce in France, rather than abroad. These editors include Moustache, Petite Friture, Superette, Specimen, Saint Luc, Goodbye Edison and many more besides.

This is a departure from old ways, when Roche Bobois and Ligne Roset were the only famous French editors. Indeed, this new phenomenon means that a new, younger generation of more international-minded designers are emerging, creating their own brands and developing them with the help of the previously listed editors. France is evolving, opening itself up in many ways to new possibilities, and design is one of the fields benefiting from these changes.

Morisset concludes by saying that these designers are being encouraged to take new initiatives, and he looks towards the future to see how the French design scene will incorporate itself more actively into the international community Beirut Design Week is helping to create.

Pauline Deltour, a designer herself then takes over to talk about her different sources of inspiration. These include “Legacy” in a big way, because she worked alongside Puiforcat for many years and a lot of her collection reflects their work. In particular, their collaboration on the “Argent de Poche” collection illustrates this relationship.

Next, Deltour moves on to talk about “Material Exploration”, for which she mainly used metal wire, bending it to her will to create anything from draining boards to umbrella stands. Next, she spoke of the “Manufacturing Process”, talking at length about the new innovative techniques she discovered, again using metal wire as a key material in her work. She explained that she wanted to use “existing anonymous objects”, which is to say everyday materials and objects that are barely noticed anymore, taking them and using them in new, innovative ways. An example of this would be a copper pot, of the type we’ve all seen at Grandma’s house, and using the material, flattening it and transforming it into a table top that was later used by an Italian restaurant as the dimensions of the table matched the dimensions of the pizza.

She therefore uses culture’s influence a lot, adapting her work following the people she collaborates with, be they Italian, Japanese, French or other, and uses layers, landscapes, valleys and stone gardens to develop her work along many different lines.

The talk was very successful and a brilliant insight into what the design scene of France looks like. We look forward to welcoming Pauline and Cedric back in the future!

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